Bloody Cranesbill

bloody cranesbill 8-24

I have started working through the composition for a Bloody Cranesbill plate. I had to get it out of my system. This was one of THE most spectacular wildflowers I saw in the Burren. Brilliant magenta flowers that one can see from  many yards away. A couple more redraws/refinements and it will be ready for color. I love doing these drawings, but I need to finish something!

Ecklinville Seedling

ecklinville seedling

Known in 1800, this cultivar was raised by a gardener named Logan, in Ecklinville, Portaferry, Belfast, County Antrim in1820. The Royal Horticulture Society listed it as one of the twelve best culinary apples. A large to very large Apple, Flat round in shape and slightly lopsided. Pale green to yellowish with an orange blush and patches of russet. Picking late August to Late September.

Drawn with Faber-Castell, Verithin, and Derwent color pencils on Fabriano paper.

Keegan’s Crab—Irish Heritage Apples

keegans crab

It is said that the original tree of this cultivar grew at Ballyhegan, Loughgall, County Armagh, from about 1880. A medium to large apple, round conical in shape and slightly lopsided. Green to slightly yellow green. Occasional net-vein russeting spreading from stem cavity to the basin. Picking mid to late September.

Drawn on mylar with Faber-Castell color pencils.

Kerry Pippin—Irish Heritage Apples

kerry pippin

The Kerry Pippin was first recorded in Tighes Survey of County Kilkenny in 1802. It was widely grown in Ireland in the 19th century. A small to medium apple. Conical and generally even in shape. Green to yellow in color, flushed orange-red with red stippling. Occasional small russet patches. Picking in mid to late August.

Drawn on mylar with Faber-Castell  and Verithin colored pencils.

Cowslips—getting close

cowslip 8-3

My cowslips for the Shakespeare exhibit in 2016 is getting closer and closer to completion. Had another good class session tonight where I got some much needed advice. I have had no less than four instructors input on this piece, and it has gotten better every time. Grateful for awesome faculty! Lots of sharpening, lots of detail work still to do, but I can see the end from here. And I’m ready to move on to something else. I’m thinking bloody cranesbill . . .

Also got to see the last half hour of Melissa Etheridge concert—for free!

 

Munster Tulip— Irish Heritage Apples

muenster tulip

The Munster Tulip was first recorded as growing in the midlands in 1951 in Tullamore and near Horseleap, County Offaly. A large, round, sometimes short, conical apple, usually even in shape. Yellow to light green in color with large patches of dark yellow to light red on the blush side. Picking late August to mid September.

Drawn with Faber-Castell color pencils.